Digital future for legal assistance

Forty-year-old Zia Gull has seven children, and her family is so poor that she could not apply for an ID card by herself. NRC helped her obtain the document in Kabul, Afghanistan. Enayatullah Azad/NRC
Forty-year-old Zia Gull has seven children, and her family is so poor that she could not apply for an ID card by herself. NRC helped her obtain the document in Kabul, Afghanistan.Enayatullah Azad/NRC

Legal and institutional frameworks can either provoke or perpetuate displacement and discrimination or serve as instruments of protection and empowerment. The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) is working to make legal assistance more accessible for people affected by displacement.

What is the humanitarian challenge?
An estimated 45,000 displaced children do not have birth certificates or other official documents proving their identity. The lack of documentation prevents many displaced people from accessing services needed in the near term, such as education, housing, refugee status determination, employment opportunities, and can have long-term consequences. The Norwegian Refugee Council’s ICLA program supports people in displacement to understand, interpret and navigate administrative and legal frameworks so they can claim and exercise their rights. However, many displaced people live in areas which NRC cannot physically access and are therefore hard to assist.

What is innovative about this project?
This project aims to make the ICLA services available for more people through digital transformation and close dialogue with beneficiaries. This to ensure that the beneficiaries are at the center of the innovation process.

What are the expected outcomes?
The project aims to radically increase the number of people receiving legal assistance through a combination of digital services and solutions reaching people in hard-to-reach areas. A 10% efficiency gain of today’s ICLA could lead to 100 000 more beneficiaries assisted annually.