Tackling improvised explosive devices

 Photo: Norwegian People's Aid
Photo: Norwegian People's Aid

Norwegian People’s Aid is in the early phases of needs assessment, identifying tools and methods to tackle the growing threat from improvised explosive devices.

What is the humanitarian challenge?
Norwegian People’s Aid have seen that the production and use of Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) and hereunder Improvised Landmines (ILM) have increased. During the last two decades non-state actors, criminal groups and terrorist organisations have in many instances gained an increased capability of producing and deploying IED and ILM. The presence of these devices is predominantly in conflicts in Myanmar, Afghanistan, the Middle East, Sahel, the Horn of Africa and Colombia.
In order to clear this contamination safely, clearance operators cannot rely entirely on the approach, methods and tools used on conventional landmines. The improvised nature of the items can make it more difficult to detect and identify. Possible reasons for this are that the item can consist of minimal or no metal, that shape, form and location can be unpredictable.

What is innovative about this project?
This project will establish an innovative process with the aim of developing a tool and method that can identify and, if possible, neutralise the crush wires (which is the firing device in the IED/ILM) remotely. Addressing these issues can greatly increase the humanitarian and socio-economic impact of clearance operators, as it will allow clearance on the most dangerous minefields with a higher degree of safety and subsequently with higher speed.

What are the expected outcomes?
Addressing these issues can greatly increase the humanitarian and socio-economic impact of clearance operators, as it will allow clearance on the most dangerous minefields with a higher degree of safety and subsequently with higher speed.